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irotsoma

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irotsoma ,
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It seems it's not so much they stole the domain, it's that they are using the same name with a different top-level domain. This is a common shady practice in malware. Most people can't afford to purchase every TLD or their domain and so just pick one or two. Problem is that search engines will find the bad TLDs and suggest them over the real TLD if the malware providers do proper SEO manipulation. A FOSS author is unlikely to be able to or afford the time and effort it takes to manipulate search results and most popular search engines are not doing much to fix the problem, and instead relying on "AI" to reduce the costs of maintaining their search results, which does a pretty bad job, IMHO.

irotsoma ,
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Ah, thanks for clarifying. I didn't see that mentioned anywhere and the git repo is showing .io

irotsoma ,
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Firefox won't for much longer. Or at least not without significant spyware installed. I'm hoping it gets forked before the new CEO can do too much damage. Sucks that it will split the community with such a small user base already. But I guess that's the point.

irotsoma ,
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Librewolf on desktop/laptop for now. Blocking Mozilla telemetry for now and sticking with Firefox for Android until a better option comes around.

irotsoma ,
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Laptops have large screens and windows software isn't designed to be data efficient. Unlimited data doesn't mean at full speed infinitely. They sell way more than they can support otherwise it would be impossible to support more than a few users at one time on a cell tower.

irotsoma ,
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Problem is that shared infrastructure shouldn't be operated for profit. But American conservatives seem to think that's the way to go. If infrastructure is shared, then there's every incentive for a business to sell even if the infrastructure can't handle it.

That being said, it's a required thing. This is why we have society in the first place. If every customer had to have their own cell infrastructure, it would be a mess and a waste. I mean you are sold unlimited bandwidth at let's say 1Gbps on 5G. There are about 1 cell tower node for every 1000 people in the US across the country. If we build enough infrastructure for everyone to use it at full speed each tower node would then need to be able to handle 1,000Gbps. That's just not possible with current technology. So should we build one tower node per person plus all of the cabling and routers to handle that much traffic? Does everyone really need to be able to download a gigabit of data every second of every day? What would you do with that data?

What internet infrastructure is designed for is peaks of up to that speed for short bursts. Not sustained speeds. And then sharing that infrastructure. Just like if everyone were to turn on their water at the same time, no one would get more than a drip, but does that ever actually happen in real usage?

The difference is that water infrastructure is owned collectively, so it is more equitably developed to make it available to all as equally as possible, rather than just to those who pay more for it.

irotsoma ,
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It's common to block an IP if the majority of traffic from that IP is not the kind of traffic you want.

Why do you need a VPN to access it? If you're protecting privacy, VPNs don't block browser-based tracking, only obfuscate where you're connecting from or preventing man in the middle type attacks from your ISP, but usually that can be better avoided simply by using secure DNS technology. Only other thing is hiding what sites you're connecting to from your ISP. If you can't change ISPs, that can be worked around by setting up a trusted, cheap VPS or something as your VPN exit point so you have your own IP address.

irotsoma ,
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Google knows what you like and these days they will take any ad because they fired all the screening staff. My ads are usually pretty average since I opt out of everything I possibly can opt out of and I use Startpage for search, so they aren't as targeted. That's one positive thing about Google. They started as a relatively ethical company for an ad company, so there's a lot of code and best practices in place for opting out of things. That is fading, but it's way better than others. Like Facebook showing ads for things I searched for a few seconds ago on Amazon and stuff like that.

irotsoma ,
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If everything you're measuring is lower than expected, you should check the calibration of the scale. Weigh 2 or 3 things you know the weight of that are at different ranges of weights, light, heavy, medium, and see if any are off. Often a scale will be accurate at only within a certain range and get progressively less accurate as the weight increases or decreases from that range.

irotsoma ,
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Yeah, it would be nice if it was easier for devs to just turn over the project to an "official" fork. Unfortunately, I'm sure that would get abused by scammers taking over projects forcefully and adding in malware before anyone notices.

irotsoma ,
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That's not that bad, depending on where you live. Seattle rarely gets below 0C and 10C is pretty normal for a high in December.

irotsoma ,
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Fault of the crappy app you're using, not Google.

irotsoma ,
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Easy enough to do with NAT unless it uses DNS over https. Then you have to block a lot more than just DNS.

irotsoma ,
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Always bad to assume gender of course, but “boi” is also often used by women with a meaning similar to “tom boy”, or “butch”, or just a woman who presents more masculine than average. Anyway, I don’t know who the model is or their preferences, just wanted to clarify the term that was used is used by several genders, most of whom are not men.

irotsoma ,
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They’re just doing what discogs did with music. They’ll create contracts with media companies to allow them to claim that all the info in their DB is copyrighted. Eventhough most of it was user created, it is technically mostly copyrighted data. And then they’ll start the legal campaigns to eliminate any competition. They’ll progressively make it more difficult to access and more difficult to update or get things corrected and it will become frustratingly bad but the only game in town.

irotsoma ,
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That’s exactly what the model is trying to learn.

irotsoma ,
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Basically, they just raised their prices by 18% and blamed it on the greedy, useless employees. I don’t know why businesses bother selflessly “creating jobs” if they are so much trouble. Shouldn’t those be the first things to cut to make their business more efficient under capitalism? Stop doing charity work and run the business yourself.

irotsoma ,
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Actually, what I’m saying was that there shouldn’t be a need for a tip at all. That 18% service charge is for services rendered outside of the production of the product, meaning the server, cashier, etc. In most countries that’s rolled into the cost of the product, not a separate charge. In the US, that’s paid for through tips instead. What they’re doing is trying to double dip. They want to keep the money that normally would go to paying the service staff a wage without raising advertised prices and also have a separate tip to actually pay them.

This is a classic bait and switch where advertised price is not what you actually pay. Doesn’t matter if they put a little sign to cover their legal obligations, it’s still disingenuous to advertise one price and charge another. Tipping and taxes are common knowledge in the US as being added on after, but a service charge in addition to tipping is not and most people will assume that the service charge is a tip and won’t also tip whereas it doesn’t go directly to the service staff like a tip does. So likely in this place, the service staff just gets their $2.13/hr or whatever the tipped minimum is there, and a few dollars here and there in actual tips but doesn’t get any of that 18% unless tips don’t cover the required hourly $5.12 tip credit.

So they need to choose. Raise your prices for more profit and keep tipping, raise your prices to pay your service staff and do away with tipping, or keep your prices lower and risk tipping not covering the minimum wage tip credit.

irotsoma ,
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I would normally be ok with paying for a service that offered something I valued if it meant they weren’t also going to make money from me as a product. This pretty much just says it won’t use your data for displaying ads. That’s the least important thing to me. I am more concerned with them selling my data or giving my data to organization that are planning to harm me with it. If an app was actually useful and being updated with new user centered features rather than only new monetization features and additionally would agree not to sell my data, ever, and to let me actually delete that data on request, I’d be happy to pay that much.

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